Invisible Dust

London | Sunday 21 January
Pollution level: Moderate

Surreal satellite images show changing climate


12/02/2013

A complex cloud pattern greeted the new year as it dawned over the eastern Pacific Ocean. The broad banks of clouds float almost exclusively over open water, except for the Galápagos Islands, which are outlined in the north-east corner of this image. Photograph: NASA

A complex cloud pattern greeted the new year as it dawned over the eastern Pacific Ocean. The broad banks of clouds float almost exclusively over open water, except for the Galápagos Islands, which are outlined in the north-east corner of this image. Photograph: NASA

The Guardian has published a series of surreal satellite images showing grinding glaciers, serpentine cloud shapes and snow-covered deserts. The images shown are only a small selection of those captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites last month.

Invisible Dust is interested in earth observation via satellite imagery, as it is a good indicator of climate change. Through satellites, the information transmitted helps to deepen our knowledge of our planet and evaluate emergencies to ensure we intervene promptly. In the broadest sense, satellites are fundamental to the conservation of our planet.

We are currently producing a schools programme to provide young people from Hounsdown school with with an imaginative and stimulating way of engaging with Space Science and Climate Change.

The young people will learn about Dr Mortimer’s research which has been instrumental in the deployment of the SISTeR (Scanning Infrared Sea Surface Temperature Radiometer) instrument, on the Queen Mary 2 cruise ship installed in 2010. The SISTeR measurement is being used to validate measurements of sea surface temperature (vital to understanding Climate Change) from satellites such as the RAL designed infrared radiometer flown on the Envisat spacecraft.

The work produced will accompany Elizabeth Price’s residency at RAL. Elizabeth Price’s residency at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is funded by a Leverhulme Trust Artists in Residence grant.

See the images here

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