Invisible Dust

London | Monday 18 December
Pollution level: Moderate

‘Human Sensor’ by Kasia Molga

The Human Sensor Project by Kasia Molga in preparation for the M © ‘Human Sensor’ by Kasia Molga courtesy of Invisible Dust, Photo at Manchester Piccadilly, photo by Nick Harrison, 2016.

“It was very moving, I felt very connected to the message…”

The ‘Human Sensor’, amazing wearable costumes created by media artist Kasia Molga,  supported by fellow media artist and creative technologist Erik Overmeire, as well as another media and interactive artist Ricardo O’Nascimento,  change colour with air pollution levels. They were premiered in a performance with dancers through city streets as part of Manchester City of Science in July 2016.

Invisible Dust ran a full programme of talks and workshops at the old Cornerhouse building on Oxford Street and welcomed a variety of guest speakers and workshop leaders – events included a Live Participatory Pollution Reading workshop with Andrew Grieve from King’s College London (shown below) and a talk on Air Pollution and Climate Change.  All our talks will be available online soon via our Vimeo page.

The Human Sensor by Kasia Molga presented to the Manchester Scie

Professor Andrew Grieve (left) of Kings College London, No.70 Oxford Road, Manchester, photo by Nick Harrison, 2016

The finale of the project was ‘A Portrait of Your Breath’ – a live collaborative performance by Kasia Molga and the sound artist Scanner at Halle St Peters.

The project has received excellent press, TV and Radio coverage including The Guardian, BBC Northwest, The Washington Post, Nature.com and London Evening Standard.  For full press coverage click here.

We are currently in discussion about future iterations of the project, both nationally and internationally – sign up to our mailing list and follow us on social media to keep up to date.

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‘Human Sensor’ is commissioned and produced by Invisible Dust in partnership with Manchester, European City of Science. It is supported by The Wellcome Trust’s Sustaining Excellence Award and Arts Council England.

Also supported by Manchester Science Partnerships, Ocean Outdoor and Wayin.

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