Invisible Dust

London | Tuesday 21 November
Pollution level: Moderate

Dangerous Air Pollution Levels in Cities Across the World


07/06/2016
Production of ‘Human Sensor’ by Kasia Molga courtesy of Invisible Dust, Photo by Kasia Molga, 2016.

Production image, Kasia Molga ‘Human Sensor’ © Kasia Molga, 2016

Concerning new data complied by the World Health Organisation (WHO) reveals that outdoor air pollution has grown 8% globally over the past five years. This rapid increase displays a worrying trend, showing that billions of people around the world are exposed to dangerous air. Some fast-growing cities in the Middle East, Southeast Asia and the western Pacific are showing pollution levels five-10 times above WHO recommended levels.

Outdoor air pollution is now the world’s biggest killer; it is responsible for more than 3million deaths a year, which is more than malaria and HIV/Aids. What’s more, this figure is expected to increase alongside ever-growing urban populations and the number of cars in the world.

By recognising and ‘seeing’ this problem we can begin to address this global health emergency. Invisible Dust is currently working with digital artist Kasia Molga and scientist Professor Frank Kelly, as part of Manchester European City of Science, to create an exciting new project ‘Human Sensor’ which explore the issue of urban air pollution. In July 2016 performs will traverse the city wearing air quality responsive illuminating capes created by Molga. This public performance will offer a rare opportunity for the public to engage with the issue of invisible pollutants though a visible, tangible, live artwork. Data collected though the project will be available to the public though an exciting and ambitious interactive website. You can read more about the project here.

‘Human Sensor’ is commissioned and produced by Invisible Dust in partnership with Manchester, European City of Science. It is supported by The Wellcome Trust’s Sustaining Excellence Award and Arts Council England.

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